Meet our team


Copyright 2020 Springer Nature Limited

What is your role within the journal?
Team manager and Senior Editor of the Bio- and Organic Chemistry team.


Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I carried out my education and academic career at Imperial College London, I clearly loved the place as I spent 8 and half years there! My PhD and postdoctoral research focused on sustainable chemistry, by making catalysts that could form polymers from renewable resources.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
My role allows me to read great science and to learn about new concepts but my absolute enjoyment comes from being part of the scientific community and talking to scientists during conferences and lab visits.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
When I am not at work you can most likely find me at a comedy gig or the theatre.

Prabhjot (PJ) Saini

Colm Pollard

What is your role within the journal?
I joined Nature Communications as an Editorial Assistant. My title now is Editorial Administration Manager, which just means I’m responsible for the brilliant team of Editorial Assistants and Editorial Assistant Supervisors (who directly manage the Editorial Assistants) for Nature Communications, the Communications Journals Series and the Nature Partner Journals.


Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I’m from Ireland (grew up in Dublin), where I had a number of administrative jobs after graduating from a science degree. I came to London and joined Springer Nature in the hopes of doing something more interesting and that I felt more strongly about (it worked!).

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
The people I work with are some of the most interesting, engaging, helpful, sincere and impressive people I’ve ever met. I’ve never worked in a better environment or contributed to more meaningful, valuable and interesting work in my whole life.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I really like walking around and taking photos of things.

Michael Rosch

What is your role within the journal?
Editorial Assistant.


Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I’m from New Jersey and have my master’s degree in Media Studies. Additionally, I am a media critic and entertainment journalist who has also written articles on a variety of scientific subjects for a general audience. Prior to coming to Nature Communications, I’ve worked in television and also as a freelance transcriptionist.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I enjoy contributing to the publication of breakthrough research across many disciplines. The work environment is also very welcoming.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
In my spare time, I’m constantly seeing new movies. I’ve also made short films and hope to make a feature film one day.

Wenfei Tong

What is your role within the journal?
Associate Editor, handling evolution, ecology, animal behaviour.


Tell us a bit about your career background: 

As a student at Princeton and Harvard, I dabbled in using genetic methods to understand the social behaviour of wild mice and zebras. My postdoc at Cambridge involved studying the evolutionary genetics underlying egg mimicry by brood parasitic birds, and as a postdoc at the University of Montana, I collaborated with national and state agencies to involve citizen scientists in bird abundance surveys for grassland bird conservation. I used to teach evolution at the University of Montana and the University of Alaska, Anchorage, and have written a couple of popular science books on bird behaviour and evolution.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Reading a broad range of interesting biology.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Birding on horseback.

Yang (Ruby) Xia

What is your role within the journal?
I joined Nature Communications as the first social science editor in 2018. I work within the Earth team and handle manuscripts in socioeconomics, environmental policies and sustainability.


Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I’m originally from China, but spent most of my university time in the UK and also started my editorial career at Nature Communications in London. I very recently relocated to our Shanghai office!

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I can see the evolution of different disciplines. I also have the chance to work with some of the most dedicated and professional editors in the world and meet up with the leading researchers in the field.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I like cooking different Chinese dishes but hotpot will be always my favourite. I also like exploring cuisines from different countries.

What is your role within the journal?
Team manager for the energy materials team.


Tell us a bit about your career background: 

My background is in photo-electrocatalysis and laser spectroscopy. I have also worked on electrode design.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
This role gives me a front seat for the latest scientific trends. I also like being part of the journey of a crude manuscript to a finished article and that this journey continues with more discussions in the new literature and at conferences.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I like to play with my son & I like to watch football when I have time.

Prateek Dongare

Becky Furlong

What is your role within the journal? 
Team Manager for the Genetics, Evolution, Ecology, Conservation Biology and Zoology team (GEECZ).

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

My research background is in genome and molecular evolution, and I was a Junior Research Fellow at Oxford before becoming an editor over 10 years ago now. I started my career at a pioneering young open access publisher, BMC, as an Associate Editor on their newly-launched flagship journal Genome Medicine. I became the Chief Editor quite quickly, almost by accident, and led the journal for 6 years. Then, I decided it was time to go back to biology, and so I moved to Nature Communications. My role now is as a team manager, partly handling manuscripts, and partly managing people and projects.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
It’s a huge privilege to see exciting new research before it’s published, and even after 10 years in the job I still love opening up new submissions to see what’s there. I also enjoy having the chance to talk about science and publishing with intelligent and like-minded colleagues. Most of all I love being a manager and my favourite part of the job is working with my team – all the Nature Communications in-house staff are great but I think my team is particularly fab.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I have two small children, so really my favourite thing to do is sleep.

Ching-yu Huang

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior editor and Team manager for the Immunology team.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I have been studying immunology for 26 years, so definitely can be lumped into ‘old school’ here. I was lucky to be in many different roles throughout my career, as a student, a post-doc, a PI, an industrial consultant, a reviewer, an author and, last but not least, an editor. With these experiences, I hope that I can better appreciate the science, as well the desire, thrill, excitement and anxiety from these many distinct perspectives, so that I can act in my best capacity as an editor to help the community and share scientific knowledge.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
The best part is of course when an Article is finally published after rigorous review that helps strengthen the science in multiple ways.  This makes me feel that I am really making a difference for the community.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
As much as I love my job, I enjoy spending whatever non-work time I have with my family and friends, be it going out for a bike ride, playing badminton in the park, or exploring and chatting online in the virtual world.

Kyle Legate

What is your role within the journal? 
Team manager of the biotechnology team.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I got my PhD in biochemistry at McMaster University in Canada. I followed that up with two postdocs in Munich, Germany; the first in cell and developmental biology and the second in biophysics and immunology. I wrote a lot of reviews. I gradually realised that I enjoyed reading about science more than I liked doing it so I jumped off the academic ship and joined the editorial team at Nature Communications at the end of 2013 to handle the cell biology content. My remit expanded to include biophysics and gradually the more applied biological sciences including methods, imaging and biotechnology. I was given the opportunity to lead a team in this space, so now I head up a team of talented individuals handling manuscripts across the wide range of applied biology, plants and computational biology.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I like waking up in the morning and not knowing what I’m going to learn that day, but it’s a guarantee that I will learn something!

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I am an avid road cyclist and have been since I was young, so when I’m not reading about science you’ll often find me on my bike, training for some long-distance event. Healthy body-healthy mind and all that. That latter part can be questioned, though, since when it’s too sloppy to ride I’m building a giant papier-mâché pigeon to scare the townsfolk (pic related).

Karin Kühnel

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior Editor in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Team.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I studied biochemistry in Berlin and Cambridge. Throughout my academic career I was interested in structural biology and used X-ray crystallography to determine the structures of proteins with various functions, among them heme containing proteins, small GTPases and their binding partners and autophagy related proteins. After my PhD at the University of Cambridge and postdoctoral work at the Max Planck Institutes in Dortmund and Heidelberg I worked as a group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen. I then moved to London to join Nature Communications.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Instead of focussing on a narrow area of research like back in academia, I now handle submissions covering the entire range of structural biology as well as protein folding, which I greatly enjoy. I love that I learn something new every day and that I am part of an amazing team. The people at Nature Communications are as international and diverse as I experienced in academia and I truly appreciate this.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I very much enjoy my life in London because there is so much to see and do. I am trying to make the most out of it and regularly go to classical concerts and the theatre and there is always something new to discover in the museums.

Michelle Trenkmann

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior Editor and proud member of the GEECZ (genetics-ecology-evolution-conservation-zoology) team, handling disease and human genetics (and sometimes other animals, too).

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I joined the journal in February 2017, after four years of postdoc-ing and ten years in academic research, finally realizing what I sort of knew all along – academic research was not for me. Already during my PhD I had played with the idea of becoming an editor and when I was offered the job at Nature Communications, it was one of the best days of my life. My research was in rheumatology and even though my editorial focus is now on (disease) genetics, I definitely have a soft spot for anything autoimmune-related.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
The daily grind can be pretty tough, but sometimes you read this amazing paper or you have a great interaction with an author or have helped a colleague in a difficult situation or you accept a paper that you know YOU have made a significant contribution to with your editorial guidance — those are the moments that make it all worth it. And then there’s also the permanent intellectual challenge that makes this job more interesting than anything else I could imagine doing.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Outside work, I like to switch off my brain and move some iron around at my gym. I do a lot of powerlifting and a little bit of CrossFit (too much cardio, but I know it’s good for me!). I love baking and I sometimes bring the results of that into the office to share with my wonderful colleagues.

Heinrich Alexander M. Leymann (Alex)

What is your role within the journal? 
Associate Editor in the Quantum, atomic, molecular and optical physics team, handling Lasers, topological photonics, nonlinear optics.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

After my diploma from the University of Greifswald on photonic crystals, I received my PhD from the University of Magdeburg on the topic of quantum dot based microcavity lasers and theory of many/few-body correlations. For my post-doc, I first went to the Max Planck institute for the physics of complex systems Dresden, and then to the BEC centre Trento. Later, I continued my work on photon statistics of micro lasers and worked on the theoretical characterization of photon BECs, Coulomb enhanced optical nonlinearities in quantum wells, and basic questions in quantum optics.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
The interdisciplinarity, the broad scope of topics that I handle, the hopefully positive impact I can have on my field, and working in a team.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Juggling balls and clubs and coming up with new patterns using mathematics.

Congcong Huang

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior editor and Team Manager for applied physics and mathematics.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I am a physicist by training. In 2012, I decided to join Nature Communications as a physics editor after 5 years of research experience at Stanford University, where I spent my time on studying liquid water using various synchrotron-based techniques. Before that, I was a graduate student at Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge and interested in understanding how atoms and molecules move around on solid surfaces which could potentially lead to designing new functioning interfaces with peculiar properties. Since 2016 I have been taking on more managerial responsibilities by leading an editorial team and I have been overseeing the journal’s contents in topics ranging across the applied physics and mathematics disciplines. I have enjoyed all different aspects of my career so far.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Working with a group of talented and dedicated editors from all around the world is the best part of my job. Many editors joined the journal right after their PhD or postdoctoral research, so we have all brought new viewpoints and ideas to the journal from different backgrounds, and contributed a bit to shape the journal into its current appearance. Our enthusiasm and willingness to grow in the job never ceases to encourage each other to do better. I enjoy discussing science with my colleagues every day, which always inspires me into possible new ways of thinking.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I have two young kids and spend most of my time with them when I am not working. My favourite thing is to have a Chinese hot pot meal with my family followed by movie time on Saturday night. I truly value my privilege to be the mother of my kids and to be an important part of their lives, too.

Erin Scott

What is your role within the journal? 
Associate Editor in the Earth Science team, handling papers in the broad areas of plate tectonics, geodynamics, geochemistry and petrology.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I am fascinated by mountains and how they form (especially when there are volcanoes involved as well). For my PhD, I studied the uplift and tectonics of the Andean mountain belt at Durham University, UK. Part of my research included a large meta-analysis of multidisciplinary datasets, combining geochemical variations of Andean magmatism with geophysical constraints of crustal thickness and the subducting slab. The best bit about my research was the fieldwork – I was lucky enough to be able to travel all over the world, either as part of my own research, or for teaching on undergraduate trips. During my field work to Chile, we travelled to the very remote Atacama desert (including the necessary satellite phones, emergency supplies, and of course our trusty rock hammers!) to hunt for outcrops of old volcanic rocks in the desert. It was an adventure I won’t forget!

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Apart from being able to read incredible science every day and learning about aspects of Earth science I might never have been exposed to in a research career, what I really love is seeing papers develop during the peer review process. It is such a great feeling when you see reviewers get as excited about a paper as you are. But even when some concerns are raised during the review process, it is awesome to watch the authors do a great job at the revisions and take the paper that extra step to make it really robust and exciting. Seeing papers you’ve helped to be published getting a lot of attention amongst the community or in the press is very rewarding.

 
When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I love music, especially going to various gigs or music festivals (and being in London is a great place for that!). I’m happiest when I’m outside, either hiking, camping, swimming, or skiing. Looking after my house plants is also a big part of my relaxation strategy after work.

Emma Ross

What is your role within the journal? 
I’m an Editorial Assistant! My days consist of supporting editors, authors and reviewers throughout the various stages of the publication process. I upload stuff, check stuff, tidy stuff, reply to stuff, facilitate the progression of stuff, and do lots of other... things. It's a pretty broad role, and I don't often run out of things to do.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

After a handful of administrative roles in different industries and completing a BA in English, I’ve settled on academic publishing for the time being. Really, I just wanted to be busy, useful, and challenged, and this fit me really well.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I feel privileged to interact with a wonderfully diverse group of interesting, talented, good-humoured people. I love knowing that I'll liaise with totally new people every day, and get to support the transmission of knowledge to the world. The role has enriched my life and I’ve made real friends here.
 

When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
You might spot me at the cinema, dancing badly to loud music somewhere, or procuring exorbitant quantities of vegetables and/or vegan sausage rolls.

Richard Pattison

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior editor, handling most of our plant science content (excluding genetics and ecology).

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I embarked on a PhD and postdoc (both in plant science) with a vague idea of following the ‘traditional’ career path and starting my own lab one day. It was great fun — I got to work with interesting people and travel the world - but gradually the PI-path became less appealing. I started to look at other options and editorial was a fantastic opportunity to remain in science but outside of the lab.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
It is a privilege to be able to read so much new and exciting science before it is public knowledge. The variety of submissions and twists and turns of the review process means the job is never boring.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Since becoming a father, I have rediscovered the joy of the municipal museum. The New York Hall of Science, Queens Museum and Glasgow’s Riverside museum are all firm favourites.

Elisa Floriddia

What is your role within the journal? 
Associate Editor, handling manuscripts in stem cell and glial biology, neurodevelopment, and neuroregeneration and repair.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I love science and to keep up with new findings and research directions. I joined Nature Communications in October 2019 after a long time doing research in the lab. I received my PhD in cellular and molecular neuroscience from the University of Tübingen, where I studied mechanisms of neuroregeneration and repair. During my postdocs, first at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Germany, and later at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, I primarily investigated cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration, neurodevelopment, and molecular and functional heterogeneity of glia cell populations.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Mmmm…. The job? Okay, if I have to pinpoint something more specific: My two favourite things are the opportunity to read about a great variety of new research findings and to discuss them in the larger context of the research field with the amazing editors in my team.
 

When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I have a few hobbies that take my mind off work and help me recharge. I love reading, visual arts and I’m an amateur photographer, so I’m always up for strolling around, reading a good book, and seeing some good exhibitions.

Johannes Kreutzer

What is your role within the journal? 
I am a Senior Editor in the Bio- and Organic Chemistry team, handling all sort of chemical soft matter and organic functional materials papers.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I initially studied chemistry with the aim to focus on biochemistry.  Very soon, however, it became clear that I better stick with the traditional chemistry studies, including inorganic and organic chemistry. I wrote my master’s thesis in computational chemistry but switched back to the lab during my PhD, working on organic/inorganic hybrid materials before taking up a post doc position in a polymer lab. During my PhD I became interested in publishing and the next logical step was to look for a job as editor after my postdoc, which eventually brought me to Nature Communications.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Oh, does it sound too simple if I mention that I like reading? I feel quite lucky to be able to read all these cutting edge research papers, quite often as one of the first people outside of the lab who gets to see this work. Besides this I enjoy working in this interdisciplinary team together with physicists, biologists, earth scientists and all the other brilliant minds at Nature Communications. I think this is what makes Nature Communications quite a special place to work.
 

When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Since I moved to London two years ago I spent a lot of time exploring the city, and I still don’t feel that I am done with it. Quite often you can find me taking photos with my camera on extended walks through the city and trying to develop films afterwards in an improvised dark room. Besides this I enjoy the variety of restaurants, concert places, theatres, museums and exhibitions which the city has to offer. Weekends you can find me quite often hiking in the countryside surrounding London.

Philip Lössl

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior Editor in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology team, handling most of the mass spectrometry-related content as well as papers in general biochemistry and some structural biology.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I come from a small village in the middle of Germany and studied biochemistry at Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg. My master’s thesis project was focused on the interactions of extracellular matrix proteins and got me interested in mass spectrometry and structural biology. After internships in an X-ray crystallography lab at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and a computational structural biology lab at Vanderbilt University in Nashville TN, I joined Utrecht University as a PhD candidate. My work in Utrecht was quite method-focused; I combined complementary mass spectrometry approaches to study the interplay and dynamics of protein structures, interactions and post-translational modifications in various biological systems, ranging from purified cell cycle kinases and cyanobacterial circadian clock proteins to intact mouse heart mitochondria. Digging into these diverse topics was one of the best parts of my PhD work and an aspect I did not want to miss in my future job, which is a major reason why I wanted to become an editor.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Working as an editor, getting to know a broad range of biological subjects and methods has become even more important and I really enjoy the constant learning. I get to read hot-off-the-press, cutting-edge research and I can interact with scientists from all over the world during conferences, lab visits or other events. On top of that, I am working in an editorial team full of helpful and interesting people with highly diverse backgrounds who keep challenging my science-related (and -unrelated) views.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I love spending time outdoors, especially skiing and hiking. Unfortunately, Berlin neither has the mountains nor the snow to really support these activities, but the city makes up for it with great concert venues, independent cinemas and theatres, which I also enjoy exploring.

Sophia Rasheed

What is your role within the journal? 
I’m an editorial assistant and I work with the editors and the editorial admin team to perform checks on manuscripts and ensure a smooth flow of them through our manuscript tracking system. I also guide and help our authors and reviewers through different stages of the process.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 

I studied biology at university and have since worked in various editorial, communications and admin roles with other publications and NGOs. I really enjoy communicating stories of science and sustainability to the world, and I’m grateful to be working at the core of where these first begin.

 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I enjoy assisting the editors, authors and reviewers with small fiddly problems, knowing that I’m somehow making their day a little easier or smoother. It’s also great to get such a vast view on what kind of research is currently happening in science. My team are a really amazing and supportive bunch of people, working through system issues or journal changes is always made fun and easy and this makes being part of the editorial admin team super enjoyable and interesting.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I really like to go on messy muddy adventures out in nature, and in the city I love co-creating fun art spaces and experiences for people at parties and fundraiser events.

What is your role within the journal? 
I’ve been an editor at Nature Communications since 2016, where I handle everything related to epigenetics, chromatin and transcription.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I’ve always been a big fan of 'Join academia, see the world.’ I did my undergraduate studies in my home country of Portugal and then moved to Paris for a PhD, where I studied stem cells and genetics in Drosophila. For my postdoc, I relocated again, this time to New York, where I worked on epigenetics and epidermal development. Over time, however, I realised I didn’t want to pursue an academic career but I very much wanted to keep working in science and in an international, multicultural environment. I was thrilled when I got a job as an epigenetics editor at Nature Communications, a journal that very much reflects the diversity of science. And I got to fulfill my dream of moving to London.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I love being an editor because I’m still involved in science while keeping a broader perspective of the field I work in. There are many fun aspects to the job, like travelling to conferences and interacting with the community. But the most rewarding part is definitely helping scientists to get their work published. Peer-review isn’t always straight-forward but I sincerely believe it ultimately helps improve most studies – as an editor, you can help to mediate this process and it is extremely satisfying to see the work ultimately published.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
At the risk of sounding like a total cliché, I try to make the most of living in London and take full advantage of the art and foodie scene; I love going to the movies and the theatre, going out for dinner and just hanging out. But my favourite thing to do is travelling I am trying to fly less and plan on exploring more of the UK and Europe by train in the future.

Carolina Perdigoto

Adam Weingarten

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior Editor for Energy Materials, Photocatalytic and Electrocatalytic Water Splitting.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I grew up around Washington, D.C., USA, and pursued Chemistry and Geophysical Science during my undergrad time at the University of Chicago. While I loved inorganic chemistry, I was drawn to supramolecular research, especially in its application to solar energy conversion, during my graduate research at Northwestern University. After Northwestern, I spent nearly 2 years in Be’er Sheva, Israel at the Ben Gurion University of the Negev exploring the photochemistry of inorganic materials, until I changed careers and began working at Nature Communications in July 2017.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I enjoy weighing in on solar-to-fuel conversion, mainly discussing big questions with other researchers. I believe this community is well-positioned to address the challenges posed by climate change through technological innovation, where the research is both fundamentally interesting and practically relevant.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
The activities that take the most of my attention, outside of work, are running, exploring new restaurants, and playing Magic: The Gathering. Running lets me vent my frustrations and burn off the calories from eating. I love exploring new places to eat, especially trying new cuisines. And MTG provides me a complex, creative outlet to explore strategy, multi-level thinking, and philosophy (the game IS that complex). I spend a smaller portion of my time exploring creative Halloween costumes to fill the New York office with extra spirit!

Ginevra Chelli

What is your role within the journal? 
Scientific Proofreader.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I am an enthusiastic interdisciplinary researcher, with a MSc in physical volcanology and natural hazards from the University of Bristol. My background is in geology, and I have recently specialised in risk, disasters and resilience with a second master’s in research at University College London. I followed a course in Guatemala, working with local scientists and dealing with volcanic threats. I then spent one year at The Open University as a postgraduate researcher studying active volcanoes in Chile leading a 15-day fieldwork expedition in the Atacama Desert.

I have developed extensive knowledge of environmental processes and hazards, which, combined with my last degree at UCL, means that I am able to evaluate data from both a pure science and social science perspective.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I love thinking that my daily work is contributing to the final publication of thousands of articles and that I can make them scientifically neat and clear. It makes me feel like I am like a small but essential gear that is part of a larger whole and I enjoy following a paper from start to end thinking about all the work and efforts that have been put in it! I love that feeling of collaboration and proactive, and not just active, involvement.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I have been dancing contemporary dance and ballet since I was little so when I can I just love to switch off my mind, rotating and jumping around with music! I have recently started again doing silk dance which is super cool and fun. In my free time, I sing in a choir and previously sang in a band while I was in university, also playing the flute and guitar. Music makes me happy no matter what so it is an important time out of work where I can relax and engage with other physical senses. 

I love spending time outside in nature and going for adventures (especially if they involve rocks and lava, haha!).

Nicholas Cherbanich

What is your role within the journal? 
I’m a scientific proofreader. We give the manuscripts a final critical look-over for errors, typos, and formatting problems that may have been missed by the authors and reviewers (or introduced by the publication process).

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I studied Pharmacology at Bristol University and did my MSc at Janssen Pharmaceutica, where I investigated the effect of psychoactive and anti-psychotic drugs on visual perception. Before Nature Communications, I worked in communications for a medical society and a psychedelic research think-tank.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Being able to read cool new research every day! My team is also delightful and makes for a very pleasant environment.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Reading novels, playing the piano, meeting my neighbours, smoothing the cat, and riding my bicycle around the towpaths.

Michael Stacey

What is your role within the journal? 
Press Manager. I’m responsible for promoting research published in Nature Communications. Each week, we produce a press release that is distributed to journalists highlighting some of the research that will be published by the journal. I also work with authors and their institutional press offices to help them coordinate their own publicity.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I studied Cell Biology and Pathology at university before taking the slightly unusual step of going to drama school. After a few years treading the boards, I returned to science and joined what is now the Springer Nature Journals and Editorial External Communications team in 2013 as an Assistant Press Officer. Since then I’ve worked across a number of our journals and Nature Communications became my focus in December 2017.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Finding out about the new research we are going to publish and seeing the news coverage it generates is always very exciting. I’m also very lucky to work with a fantastic team in the press office and great colleagues across the journal.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Theatre remains a large part of my life outside of work. It’s not unheard of to find me learning lines for a show on my lunch break.

Silvia Milana

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior Editor and Team Manager for the condensed matter physics and astronomy team.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I am senior editor and team manager at Nature Communications, where I lead a subject-based team of six editors with a focus on fundamental and condensed matter physics and astronomy. In addition to that, I oversee manuscripts covering underlying physics and applications of two-dimensional materials, van der Waals heterostructures and resulting devices. In an earlier role as associate editor, I handled manuscripts on large-area synthesis of two-dimensional materials, electronic devices and nanoscale light-matter interaction. Prior to joining Nature Communications, I was a research associate at the Engineering Department of Cambridge University and a junior research fellow at St Edmund’s College. My research at the Cambridge Graphene Centre focused on light interaction with graphene, related two-dimensional materials and plasmonic nanostructures, with emphasis on optical spectroscopy of layered crystals and heterostructures.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I am passionate about science communication, and I am proud to be an active member of the research community I represent. Although I don’t output primary research anymore, I feel I still am part of the two-dimensional materials academic community, and I strive to show prospective and current authors of Nature Communications manuscripts that I genuinely care about them, the work they do, and the effort they put into their research. I enjoy attending conferences and participating in lab visits; when I travel, I never shy away from the available opportunities to engage with authors in detailed face-to-face discussions about the science behind their papers. In my editorial capacity, I like to think of myself as a magnifying glass: I aim to give authors the best possible chance to enhance the impact and visibility of their research. I feel very lucky to be surrounded by passionate, dedicated, and hard-working colleagues at Nature Communications with impressive depth and breadth of expertise across several areas, within both physical and life sciences. The journal really is an intellectually stimulating environment, where I learn something new every day, and it makes me really proud that submitted manuscripts are in such good hands.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I try to focus on activities that unleash the more creative side of my personality, which remains partly neglected during my daily reading of scientific manuscripts. I enjoy attending art exhibitions, going to museums (I love natural history and anthropology), watching documentaries on literally everything, and going for long walks in the outdoors.

María García Fernández

What is your role within the journal? 
Associate Editor within the Cancer team, handling manuscripts in cancer-stem cells and cancer therapeutics.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I joined Nature Communications over one year ago and I moved directly from my third post-doc position, so I made quite a late movement in my professional career from the bench to editorial work. I did my PhD in the University of Sevilla (my hometown) on hypoxia/hypoglycaemia sensing, then moved to The Rockefeller University in NY for a postdoc on apoptosis and leukaemia/lymphoma development. I moved back to Spain for another postdoc at the CNIO in Madrid, on melanoma and then to Cambridge for my last postdoc on the crosstalk between mesenchymal and haematopoietic stem cells. Quite a long and variable background…
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
There are many aspects of working as an editor that I really enjoy. To name some, the opportunity of learning “brand-new” science and expanding my knowledge to different aspects, the interaction with the authors and the possibility of participating in guiding the direction that science is moving in.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Spending time with my family.

Sebastian Müller

What is your role within the journal? 
Associate editor within the Earth Team. I handle manuscripts across the disciplines of geophysics, hydrology and planetary geology.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
After enrolling in an undergraduate program in geosciences, I quickly got very much fascinated by volcanology. I hence pursued a masters’ and a PhD in Volcanology. After that, I moved to Honolulu, Hawai’i, to work as a research fellow at the University of Hawai’i and to be really close to active volcanism. I further worked at the Montserrat Volcano Observatory (West Indies) as well as at the Colima Volcano Research Center (Mexico).

In 2018 I traded field work and active volcanism in for the fascinating editorial role at Nature Communications. I now get to read the latest research on an everyday basis.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Working for Nature Communications means that I am part of a global, multi-cultural team of colleagues which clearly contributes significantly to an interesting daily work life. 


On a daily basis, it is my job to read new research articles on Earth and Planetary Sciences – the curiosity about which physical processes drive our planet and Solar System is what brought me into geosciences from the beginning. I couldn’t imagine a more interesting job. 

As an editor, I still attend conferences and workshops and get into personal contact with our authors and reviewers. This allows me to continue to be an active part of the scientific community which is very valuable to me.

When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I am part of a semi-professional swim team in Berlin and you will usually find me in the pool when I am not working. The physical activity is a most welcome balance to our office job.  I compete in open-water swim challenges.

Selina La Barbera

What is your role within the journal? 
I joined the journal in October 2018 as Associate Editor in the Applied Physics Team. I am handling manuscripts from the areas of inorganic and flexible electronics, semiconductor physics, optoelectronics and integrated circuits. I am based in the Berlin office.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
Graduate of Polytechnic University of Turin in Italy and Paris Diderot University in France, I obtained a PhD in Electronics Engineering, Micro and Nanotechnologies from the University of Lille1 in France. I continued postdoctoral / industrial research in the field of emerging memories for Neuromorphic applications at CEA-Leti in France.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Making authors happy. The exposure to the latest scientific and technological advances at both academic and industrial levels. The opportunity to travel, attending international conferences, making lab visits as well as organizing Nature conferences. Making editors happy with the (BBC) Berlin Baking Club ☺


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Les Mills Classes (RPM/ Body Attack/ Body Combat), Yoga and Sauna. Eating sashimi and grilled mushrooms. Scuba Diving on vacation.

Eva Mae Brazil (Eve)

What is your role within the journal? 
Scientific Proofreader.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I have only recently moved to London and become a part of Nature Communications after having spent a year in Bristol carrying out research to investigate novel methods to quantify affective bias and reward processing as part of my master’s course in Neuroscience and Pharmacology with Prof. Emma SJ Robinson.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I feel very privileged to not only be exposed to such a breadth and variety of scientific research, but to also be responsible for ensuring that authors are delighted with the final articles and that our publications are of the highest quality. Above all, I feel very fortunate to work as part of such a lovely team.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I love being with people and exploring. I spend a lot of my time doing yoga, drinking tea and trying to learn about the wonders of the natural world.

Bo Liu

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior Editor, handling manuscripts on solar cells and halide perovskite photophysics.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I had 4 years of postdoctoral research experience before I joined Nature Communications. I always thought I would be a professor someday, like many of my former colleagues and friends did. But you never know!
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I enjoy most taking part in the process of improving the manuscripts and getting it published.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
There are several things I like, but my favorite is reading.

Luca Danelli

What is your role within the journal? 
Associate Editor in the Cancer team. I handle papers in cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I grew up and studied in Italy where I also did my PhD. I then lived in Paris for three-years, doing a first post-doc, before moving to London in 2016. Immunology has always been at the centre of my scientific life!
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I started my career as an editor only few months ago but I like spending my time reading about my favourite topic (cancer immunology)… without thinking any longer about experiments not working!


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Watching (more than playing!) football games or any other sort of sport. I also enjoy reading (I literally grew up in a book shop) and walking around.

Robert Guilliatt

What is your role within the journal? 
Associate Editor handling manuscripts related to biomaterials, biomedical applications of nanomaterials, drug delivery and bio/chemical/biochemical sensors.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I had no idea what I wanted to do at university so went through the A-Z list of courses available in the UK and found one that sounded interesting. My degree in Nanotechnology made me a master of the multidisciplinary, which I have maintained throughout my academic and editorial career. I considered myself a chemist pretending to be a biologist when I started a PhD in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. Somewhere in my PhD and Postdoctoral position, working for the NHS blood and tissue services, I became a biologist. Now, as an editor, I am a multidisciplinary biologist pretending to be a chemist.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I love reading new and interesting science. As an editor I get to see the latest research and know what is happening in a field before most of the researchers in that field. I also get a wider view of an area than I think any academic can get.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Considering I spend all my time reading at work, my favourite activity is reading sci-fi and fantasy books. I also love going to the gym to do boxing, muay thai and Brazilian jiu jitsu.

Michele Marass

What is your role within the journal? 
I am a scientific editor handling manuscripts in the areas of vasculature, blood and kidney biology. As a member of the biomedical and translational research team, I am interested in a wide range of studies, including translational ones, investigating biological processes underlying disease conditions using model organisms, and therapeutic and clinical studies, involving human subjects.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
During University I was very interested in a variety of topics, ranging from molecular biology and genetic engineering to human pathology, ethology, X-ray crystallography, biophysics and bioinformatics. I got my master’s degree in Industrial Biotechnology with a thesis on physiological and pathological angiogenesis, and for my doctoral studies I decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the embryonic development of the cardiovascular system using zebrafish and mouse as model organisms. I conducted my PhD in the laboratory of Prof Didier Stainier at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, where I had the opportunity to study not only vasculogenesis but also the role of blood vessels during heart regeneration and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

Towards the end of my PhD, I realised that my favourite aspect of science was the intermingling of different topics and subjects, and I personally found extremely exciting the discussions sparked by novel discoveries not necessarily in my primary area of research. I therefore decided to transition from academia to a role that would allow me to be in contact with a variety of scientific topics, and I was fascinated by the idea of working as a scientific editor. After my PhD, I had worked in a publishing company handling clinical and translational papers in the field of oncology for a little more than a year, during which I had the opportunity to manage a small team of scientific editors. After this experience, in January 2020, I started working as an associate editor in Nature Communications.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Among all facets I like about this role, I find particularly enjoyable to talk with my colleagues about the potential implications that a specific discovery may have within and beyond a certain research field.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I like playing sports (football, netball and basketball), seeing musicals, and cooking.

Fiona Gillespie

What is your role within the journal? 
Managing Editor.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
After completing my PhD in Combustion Chemistry at NUI Galway, Ireland, I decided to move into an editorial role as that was where my strengths and interests were. I worked as a Publishing Editor at the Royal Society of Chemistry for two years, learning about a broader range of Chemistry research and supporting various projects. In 2016, I moved to Nature Communications, first as Editorial Administration Manager and now as Managing Editor.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
As the operations and project manager at the journal, I interact with many colleagues across the company, from Editorial Operations to Production to Marketing. I love meeting and working with my colleagues and being able to take on very varied projects. There's nothing more satisfying than improving a process at the journal, especially if it has a positive impact on author satisfaction!


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I sing with two choirs, the Springer Nature Singers and the Stratford East Singers, which is amazing for my mental health and wellbeing! When not singing or working, I enjoy reading and yoga, spending time with my cat and exploring London.

Alexa McKay

What is your role within the journal? 
I am a Senior Editor on the ‘GEECZ’ (genetics, evolution, ecology, conservation, and zoology) team, handling ecology and zoology manuscripts.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I’m from Colorado, but like many academics I moved around a lot over the course of my education and research career. At various times, my research pursuits in behavioural ecology and disease ecology brought me to Arizona to study lizards, to Missouri to study ticks and mosquitos, to California to study sticklebacks, and finally to Georgia where my dissertation research focussed on trade-offs between investment in immune defenses, reproduction, and migratory behavior in the monarch butterfly.

I became interested in editorial careers mid-way through my PhD. I loved reading the literature outside my direct research area, writing proposals, and the publication process, but I never got as excited about all of the parts in-between. After seeing some editors speak on career panels and meeting editors at conferences, I realized that this career would allow me to stay deeply involved in science but not have to do the research myself. I actually found out that I got the job at Nature Communications the same day I defended my dissertation; that was probably the 3rd best day of my life, after my wedding and the birth of my daughter! 
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
I enjoy the problem-solving required throughout the course of peer review; decisions are rarely straightforward and it is intellectually engaging to make justifiable decisions at every stage. I also enjoy helping authors communicate their science effectively by editing titles, figures, etc., and by promoting papers in the press and on social media. I take pride in papers that I play a hand in publishing, even if my name is never publically associated with any of them.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Reading ecology-themed books to my one-year-old, playing board games with friends, crafting cocktails, and traveling.

Anne Mirabella

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior editor in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology team. I mostly handle molecular biology manuscripts looking at many processes involving DNA, including its replication, damage and repair in health and disease.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I did my PhD at Imperial College but before that I spent some time snowboarding in NH, while spending numerous hours with mice, melanoma cells and proteasome inhibitors. The main focus of my post-graduate career was on studying how some funky but essential protein complexes fire away across the genome when it’s time for a cell to divide. The switch from academia to the editorial world was a jump in the dark, but one of my best decisions so far.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
Every day there is something different, so challenges and opportunities are aplenty. I obviously enjoy seeing where the field is going, chatting with authors at conferences and sharing their enthusiasm for their discoveries. It is just exciting seeing a manuscript going from an early hopeful submission to a confident piece of science and being part of the improvement strategy.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Cooking is stereotypical being partially Italian, but it keeps my mind off work (yes, sometime editors need to switch off too!). I also enjoy exploring London with my family, taking road-trips with friends and spending time with my kid and two cats. Finally, concerts and more concerts.

James Keane

What is your role within the journal? 
Production Editor.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I did a publishing masters at university and then I briefly worked in communications before I started at the company in 2015. When I first started, I worked on the production of the Palgrave Journals for two years before joining the Nature Communications production team at the end of 2017. I also spent some time teaching snowboarding in Canada in a past life.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
One of the things I enjoy most is the team I work in. The production team consists of 9 members and everyone is really fun. We have regular team socials where we go for walks together or do a fun activity. 


Another great part of my job is that every day is different and our tasks vary from day to day, even though we have our daily core tasks. It never gets boring! Helping authors to have a great looking paper and seeing a paper published after you’ve spend a lot of time working on it is really satisfying.

When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
In my free time, I like to be active and walk my dog, go for a run or do yoga. Sometimes you can find me in the pub.

Enda Bergin

What is your role within the journal? 
Chief Editor, Physical Sciences.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I am an organic chemist by training. I did a PhD and some postdocs in the area of catalysis (especially asymmetric catalysis) and then was an Assistant Professor in Organic Chemistry. I moved into editing in early 2013, starting at the Royal Society of Chemistry (Dalton Transactions, CrystEngComm, and Catalysis Science and Technology) and then at Nature Communications. It was a much smaller journal at the time, and seeing it grow month on month in terms of submissions and editors was impressive!

I was promoted to senior editor and then became team manager for the bio and organic chemistry editors. Next, I moved to Berlin and launched Nature Catalysis, which was a lot of work but I am very happy with how it has gone. And now, almost exactly three years later, I have come back to Nature Communications to run the physical sciences side of the journal. I am excited to get started.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
It is always great to open up a new paper and see an unexpected result or learn something new. Also, the people I work with are great, and I have made a number of close friends throughout the years.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
I enjoy running and regularly take part in 5k and 10k races. Also I am a music fan and love going to concerts and festivals.

Ross Cloney

What is your role within the journal? 
Senior Editor on the Biotechnology team, handling synthetic biology and genome engineering.

Tell us a bit about your career background: 
I did my PhD and postdocs at the University of Sussex, investigating how DNA gets damaged and then how the cell (tries) to repair it. I spent a lot of time in a dark room counting dots under a microscope. DNA damage is extremely cool but over time I realised what really excited me was just how much great science across many different fields is out there. I decided to travel the path from academia to editorial so I could stay closely connected to science.
 
What do you enjoy most about your role? 
The engagement with my communities is great – synthetic biology and genome engineering are really vibrant areas with a lot of young researchers full of ideas on how to change the world for the better. Being an editor means I can see lots of the work being done and discuss it with the people shaping the field. There is something really nice about taking a gamble on a paper that has potential and seeing it develop.


When you are not working, what's your favourite thing to do?
Is Netflix a hobby? It helps to pad out the time when I’m not at the gym lifting heavy things up and down. As anyone who follows me on Twitter might know, I also dabble in pickling, brewing, bread making and fermenting. Oh, and getting more science and philosophy themed tattoos.

To go from manuscript submission to paper publication, every day Nature Communications relies on the expertise of over a hundred editors along with support from editorial assistants, production editors and proof-readers.  Here are some of the people behind the journal.